Tickets for the NonfictioNOW 2018 keynotes are now on sale! All keynotes take place at the Orpheum Theatre in Downtown Phoenix. Tickets are $8 each or $20 for all four exclusive of taxes and fees. (Please note that all keynotes are included in conference registration: if attending the conference, there's no need to buy tickets separately.)

 
 
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Francisco Cantu

Francisco Cantú is a writer, translator, educator, and the author of The Line Becomes a River. From 2008 to 2012 he served as an agent for the United States Border Patrol in the deserts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. A former Fulbright fellow, he is also the recipient of a 2017 Whiting Award. His essays and translations have been featured on This American Life and in Best American Essays, Harper’s, Guernica, Orion, n+1 and Ploughshares. He lives in Tucson, Arizona.

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Gretel Ehrlich

Gretel Ehrlich is the author of 15 books of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry—including The Solace of Open Spaces, Heart Mountain, This Cold Heaven, and Facing the Wave, which was long-listed for the National Book Award. Her books have won many awards, including the first Henry David Thoreau Award for Nature Writing, the PEN USA Award for Nonfiction, the Harold D. Vurcell Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, three National Geographic Expedition Grants for travel in the Arctic, a Whiting Award, and an NEA. Her work has appeared in Harper's, the Atlantic, Orion, the New York Times Magazine, and Best Essays of the Century, among many other publications. Her poetry was featured on the PBS NewsHour. Gretel traveled for 20 years in northwestern Greenland by dogsled with subsistence Inuit hunters. In 2007, the National Geographic Expeditions Council sent her around the top of the world to explore with indigenous Arctic people in Alaska, Nunavut, Greenland and Arctic Russia, how their lives were affected by climate change. An updated report from Greenland on climate and Arctic culture appeared in the April, 2015 issue of Harper’s Magazine. She lives with her partner, Neal Conan on a farm in the highlands of the Big Island of Hawai’i, and a cabin in Montana.

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Stephanie Elizondo Griest

Stephanie Elizondo Griest is a globe-trotting author from the Texas-Mexico borderlands. Her books include the travel memoirs Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana; Mexican Enough; and All the Agents & Saints: Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands as well as the best-selling guidebook 100 Places Every Woman Should Go. She has also written for The New York Times, Washington Post, VQR, The Believer, Orion, and The Oxford American. Distinctions include a Margolis Award for Social Justice Reporting, a Hodder Fellowship at Princeton, and a Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Gold Prize. She teaches creative nonfiction at UNC-Chapel Hill and can be found at StephanieElizondoGriest.com.

 

Melissa Lucashenko

Melissa Lucashenko is an award-winning Aboriginal writer who lives between Brisbane and the Scenic Rim. Melissa’s most recent novel, Mullumbimby, was awarded the Deloitte Queensland Literary Award for Fiction, won the Victorian Premiers Prize for Indigenous Writing, and was longlisted for both the Stella and Miles Franklin awards as well as the Dublin IMPAC Literary Prize 2015. Melissa was awarded the $80,000 CAL Fellowship for 2016 to work on her next novel, Too Much Lip. Melissa is a Walkley Award winner for her non-fiction, as well as a founding member of Qld prisoner support group Sisters Inside.